Thursday, March 15, 2012

Birth control... huh?

I've made no secret of the fact that I think birth control is a good thing. I don't think this is a terribly radical viewpoint. Frankly, I'm a little confused. It's the 21st century and we're arguing about birth control? Really? Did I accidentally go back in time and now there's a chance my mother might fall in love with me, irradicating my own existance? Is this something I need to worry about??

But anyway, assuming it's still 2012, here's what I really don't get:

Everyone says that most of the people who are against birth control are men. And if men could get pregnant, this wouldn't be an issue. It's all about punishing women for having sex. Except....

Don't men like sex?

In fact, it could be argued that they like it more than women. A lot more. I mean, rapists... they're almost all men, right? Prostitutes might be mostly women, but the ones who are willing to actually pay money for sex are almost all men. The women are just trying to make a living. And those jokes about married couples... isn't it the woman who usually has the headache and tries to get out of sex? Is there really any indication that women are these sex-starved creatures that men are fighting off with a stick?

So why is it a bad thing that your wife/girlfriend has birth control and can have sex with you more often?

And on the procreation issue, the same thing applies. Do men give squeals of pleasure when they hold a tiny newborn baby? Do men walk through the baby aisle in a department store and have to touch all the tiny little baby clothes? Do men get "plucky" and jealous of their expecting friends? Do men want babies THAT BAD?

To be honest, in most married couples I know, the men were the driving force behind waiting to procreate. Yes, the woman has to carry the baby for nine months. But after that, both parents get to be woken up at 3AM by a crying baby. And have to pay all the related expenses.

So, um, WHY do men think birth control is bad again?

Obviously, any career-minded woman should support legislation that makes it easier for us to get birth control. And you know who else should support it? Men who like having sex.

18 comments:

  1. Applause! Lots of Applause!!!

    From Your {Catholic} Doctor' Wife

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  2. Oh man. I just did a huge write up on this yesterday. Check it out if you're interesting. This issue is just infuriating.


    Birth Control Debate

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  3. here here! And it would also make the abortion debate way less of an issue - less unwanted pregnancies = less abortion. Its WIN/WIN!

    And I'm CATHOLIC too and feel like this.

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  4. Well said. McFizz for President!

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  5. I will never understand why people are against this. Agree with everything you said!

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  6. I think this is hilarious! Great Job. I can't believe that this is an issue. Is this the same insurance companies that ok prescriptions for Viagra? Now that is a prescription for sex. Why should I be surprised though, the FDA continues to believe that testosterone is also just for me.

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  7. I am all for people having accesses to birth control but I do understand why people of some religious backgrounds aren't okay with taking birth control. But my religious convictions shouldn't prevent others from receiving it.

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  8. So true. Plus, it keeps from adding more babies to Medicaid...

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  9. I think the point of the political debate is that Catholic institutions should not be forced to PAY for birth control, since it is against their doctrine. Beyond that, it shouldn't be anyone's business. Sadly, what should be a very personal issue has been forced to the headlines by BOTH sides of the debate. Let's keep it in the bedroom/bathroom/kitchen/back yard/poolside/..... where it belongs, OK?

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  10. Dalai: Regarding the Catholic institutions not paying for birth control, that IS a problem in my opinion. First of all, the Catholic institutions aren't paying for the birth control, the insurance actually is. Second, my tax dollars paid for a war that I strongly do not support. Everyone in this country pays for things they don't support. It's called living in a Democracy. The Catholic church shouldn't be exempt. And if they don't want to deal with this, maybe they shouldn't be employing people. Anyway, old argument.

    What pisses me off even more than this though is that Catholic Presidential candidate Rick Santorum doesn't support birth control *for anyone*. He's been quoted as saying that birth control gives women a license to do immoral things. He's in favor of states having the ability to ban the sale of birth control. The best I can say is that he's not a hypocrite because he's got seven kids and his own wife doesn't work.

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  11. K., I agree with your point. In fact, someone should make the case that birth Control only just benefits heterosexual couples. Paying for birth control could be seen as encouraging and condoning heterosexual sex. Maybe Rush Limbaugh secretly prefers college age women to be lesbians.

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  12. The part I don't understand is why an insurance company or any employer wouldn't want to cover birth control considering the alternative is to cover pregnancy/childbirth/pregnancy leave... unless they plan on taking a few more steps back in women's rights and either ban sex or make getting pregnant a firable offense.

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  13. The issues are this in my opinion, when a religion becomes a major employer like a Catholic Hospital system that hires non-Catholic workers they then force those workers to proscribe to their religious doctrine outside of work in a choice the worker should be allowed to make for themselves. Secondly, how would we feel if blood products were not a covered benefit because Jehovah Witnesses are against their use?

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  14. Sigh. I thought "my sisters and I" (and Alan Alda) went through all of this decades ago. It was no fun burning our bras and thumping against glass ceilings (and admission's quotas, and our parent's expectations, and answering interview questions about our reproductive futures). I thought we went through all of this so that the world would be a better place for our daughters and our daughter's daughters. What a silly fool. There are men who want to roll back the clock and a group of women who are willing to LET them.
    You (haven't) come a long way, baby!

    I'm over the age where this is an issue now, but for heaven's sake - stand up for your rights and don't let a church (ANY church) put their rights (and yes, they have them) ahead of YOURS!

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  15. Rick Santorum has the IQ of a brick and likely less logical thought processes.

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  16. The "insurance" may pay for the birth control, however the employer pays the premiums so therefore pays for the birth control.

    The biggest problem is in the situations where the institution is self-insured and runs its own insurance- this isn't uncommon, even amongst Catholic and other religious institutions.

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  17. These men do like sex with women -- they just want to control when, and how, and with whom women have sex. They want to punish women for having the wrong kind of sex, which includes making sure women don't enjoy sex too much, because that might lead them to misbehave. We are permitted -- nay, in a perfect world, required -- to have sex with them according to their rules; all others must suffer consequences.

    Not that any of this rises to the level of conscious planning, of course; it lives in the id with all the other nasty prejudices that inform our politics. Men who oppose birth control are not a legion of mustache-twirling villains, tying us to the train tracks; they're only people who have learned dangerous lessons about fear and control from the cultures they were raised in.

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