Thursday, March 20, 2014

What medication are you on?

12 comments:

  1. hahaha! I love the sack. It's always got empty bottles, expired antibiotics, and multivitamins in it too. I always wonder if people just say, "it's time for my meds," pull a random bottle out of the sack, take one of whatever is in it, and put the bottle back in the sack.

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  2. I would give it a 25% chance of it containing the letter E or the vowel sound e somewhere in its name. The far more likely scenario is that they ONCE took a medication that had an E in it and this replaced that. Anyway you can call their pharmacy (note: they use three different pharmacies) to find out what they really take.

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  3. Great post. This post is really enjoyable and helpful for us. thanks for your nice post.
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  4. Don't forget the round one.

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  5. The best is when I reached into the sack and there were USED insulin syringes with needles uncapped in there.

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  6. "Why are YOU asking ME? I got it from YOU. YOU should already know this!" -- said by person I have never met before in my life.

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  7. Now hey, I am a data queen and this can be one question you don't want answered. I produce more articles than an MSTP candidate. I told my docs I take D*3* not D*2* (they are different, different dosages too) and they only mark it was D. So when I just got told today to take D2 also, I'm sitting here going ... yeah I can see this. D2 is a different dose (and a prescription) than what D3 (OTC) is.

    I was reading a book and the #1 group doctors hated wasn't lawyers, it was IT. Try taking someone with a medical and IT background (especially in databases) who was on the debate team for several years.

    You'll be asking for ICD 10, another admin layer, and a 10% paycut.

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  8. Ana, that happened to me one time too! Scared the crap out of me because I was just reaching in there trying to make sense of the meds. There were all kinds of bottles of meds, needles, syringes, and unrefrigerated insulin bottles. Ugh.

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  9. Write your congresspeople/senators and tell them to make the HIPAA act enforce truly portable medical records.

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  10. hilarious but true. Computers are making this better tho.

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  11. Sorry, anonymous, but I have to disagree with your comment that computers are making it better to determine what meds the patient is on.

    My PCP is compulsive about accurate documentation and timely follow-up. He updates my meds and my history at every single visit. We learned that his compulsiveness was not enough, however, when I went into the hospital for knee replacement surgery. My ortho surgeon was upset that I did not tell him all of the meds I was on or of my cardiac problem. He considered cancelling my surgery! WHAT?

    It was then that we all learned that the printed version of my EMR contained different information from what is seen on the screen. The computer had stored - and printed as current - every med that had ever been prescribed for me!!! (Actually, on close inspection, there was a code identifying past and present meds, but they were all jumbled together and not easily distinguished.) This list included my ONE and ONLY prescription for a beta-blocker to treat a short-lived benign arrhythmia from 7 years earlier and my ONE and ONLY prescription about 3 years following that for a low dose diuretic. Both scrips were for prn use, and both were for short-term symptom control of benign conditions; neither scrip was ever refilled. Yet, based on these two scrips from years apart, the computer listed two inaccurate diagnoses for me - hypertension and Cardiac Problem, NOS (Not Otherwise Specified). And, because it never forgets anything, the computer published these inaccurate diagnoses to anyone who had access to my record, including my health care insurer.

    My PCP was eventually able to fix the issue, both in my EMR and with my insurer, but I'm just glad I didn't try to buy life insurance during that time. TCG

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  12. A bag?? Psssh! My mother used to have to haul around a SUITCASE...a freakin' SUITCASE if she left the house for more than a few hours.

    A. Suitcase.

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