Thursday, December 4, 2014

Name that injury

I know I haven't done many drawings lately, which may be why my artistic skills have been starting to deteriorate. Any guesses what this drawing I did for a patient yesterday is supposed to represent. Bonus points if you can guess the actual pathology:



21 comments:

  1. A vascular necrosis of the femoral head?

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  2. Trochanteric fracture. Picture is very clearly the femur connecting with the pelvis. Better drawing than I could do!

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  3. Femoral head fracture secondary to a vascular necrosis?

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  4. Since no one guess this yet -- slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE).

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  5. serpiginous line at the head looks like osteonec. but the straight line makes me think fem. neck fx

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  6. Osteonecrosis of femoral head. Plus, femoral neck fracture

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  7. The anatomy is correct. But that line that sort of looks like a femoral neck fracture is actually just a stray pen mark and not pathology.

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  8. If you flip it upside down, it looks like someone stubbing their toe.

    I also just learned that if you take a map of the Michigan and southern Ontario area and rotate it on its side, southern Ontario looks like an elephant with its trunk raised.

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  9. I'm going to defy common sense and say pelvic stress fracture.

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  10. Degradation of the femoral head due to osteoporosis?

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  11. fibrous dysplasia

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  12. Black dot is an osteophyte in a bad case of osteoarthritis of hip joint? And you were explaining hip replacement!?

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  13. Not a femoral neck fracture. Okay. Then this patient has acute Straypenmark Syndrome.

    Can I have an order for 2cc of Wite-Out?

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  14. Fibrous dysplasia??? I dunno wats this

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  15. A pellet from an old shotgun blast had lodged in the femoral head and is causing extensive wear after all these years.

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  16. femoral acetetubular impingement?

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  17. The answer is that there was a bone fragment in the fovea.

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  18. Soooo.... Me the other day (neurology senior), trying to be a smart ass, to the orthopods looking at an X-ray: "hey did you know there's a nail in that elbow??"
    Orthos: "....this a knee. You can tell, because it has a knee cap."
    Me: "Oh."

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